This website is designed to give voice to the people of the Republic of the Marshall Islands [RMI] who have firsthand knowledge - in their bodies and DNA, in their memories and permanently in their atolls - of thermonuclear weapons and their destruction, having been at the receiving end of the United States' "foreign policy."


AtomicAtolls.org's primary mission is to provide a repository of the unfiltered history of the relationship between the U.S. and RMI through an archive of audio interviews [in both Marshallese and English*] on SoundCloud (previously unavailable to the public) and photographs of downwind Marshall Islanders who were caught in the radioactive fallout from the 67 atomic & hydrogen thermonuclear bombs detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls between 1946-58.

 

In addition to these rare and powerful interviews conducted between 1981 and 2002 [by Glenn Alcalay & Kai Erikson], numerous unclassified U.S. government documents, U.N. testimonies, NGO reports, and other educational materials regarding nuclear testing issues in the Marshall Islands will also be made available to the public.  Lastly, a large archive of videos and documentary films about the Nuclear Age, from the Manhattan Project to Weapons in Space will be made available.

Our website is dedicated to aolep dri-Majol, people of the Marshall Islands - especially the youth - and all of the glorious people who reside on our dear Mother Earth.  If there is a theme or a meme that truly captures the character of this website, it is this:  America nuked the Gentle People.

Glenn Alcalay

Peace Corps Volunteer, Utrok Atoll 1975-1977

Jeramman wot!

Glenn Alcalay & Andrew Fuchs

www.AtomicAtolls.org

© 2015-2020

Nuclear Testing Chronology: 1960's

 The progeny - F2 & F3 generations - of Rongelap islanders exposed to the dangerous radioactive fallout from the March 1, 1954 "Bravo" hydrogen bomb equalling about 1,000 Hiroshima A-bombs.

1963
The first thyroid tumors begin appearing among the Rongelap people exposed to the Bravo test in 1954. Also, a higher than normal incidence of growth retardation among young Rongelap Islanders is noted by U.S. doctors.

 

​​1966
January - The U.S. Congress approves an exgratia payment of $950,000 (about $11,000 per capita) to the exposed Rongelap people for injuries resulting from their exposure in 1954.

1967

U.S. government agencies began considering the possibility of returning the Bikinian people to their homelands based on data on radiation levels on Bikini Atoll from the U.S. scientific community. This scientific optimism stemmed directly from an Atomic Energy Commission study that stated, "Well water could be used safely by the natives upon their return to Bikini. It appears that radioactivity in the drinking water may be ignored from a radiological safety standpoint...The exposures of radiation that would result from the repatriation of the Bikini people do not offer a significant threat to their health and safety."

1968

June - The story appeared on the front page of the New York Times: President Lyndon B. Johnson promised the 540 Bikinians living on Kili [below] and other islands that they would now be able to return to their homeland. The President also stated that, "It is our goal to assist the people of Bikini to build, on these once desolated islands, a new and model community." He then ordered Bikini to be resettled "with all possible dispatch."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1969

August - An eight-year plan was prepared for the resettlement of Bikini Atoll in order to give the crops planted on the islands a chance to mature. The first section of the plan involved the clearing of the radioactive debris on Bikini Island. This segment of the work was designed by the AEC and the U.S. Department of Defense. Responsibility for the second phase of the reclamation, which included the replanting of the atoll, construction of a housing development and the relocation of the community, was assumed by the U.S. Trust Territory government.

 

October - Bikini Atoll is declared safe for rehabitation by U.S. officials. "There's virtually no radiation left and we can find no discernible effect on either plant or animal life," says the AEC.

 

Satellite image of single Kili Island, without a lagoon [L].  Marshallese society is marinated in its unique atoll culture with a protected lagoon.  When Glenn first visited Kili in 1975 the ex-Bikini islanders referred to their new home as "jikin callaboj" [lit. "the prison"].  As the Earth has now supasssed 400 p-p-m of CO2 in our atmosphere, severe climate change produces the type of flooding seen on Kili Island [R].  The five all-atoll nations of the world are the new 'canaries in the coal mine' as their island nations sink into the sea.

For more info re: climate change in the Pacific go here:     https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/31/visionary-document-small-island-nations-declare-climate-crisis-pacific         And go here to see what Pacific Island leaders are doing about climate change:        

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1cbSloYVSuY4mIZnUUC5ISpZUaV3NTb2y/view       

And go here for an update on the Pacific Forum meeting        https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/16/behavior-australias-prime-minister-pacific-islands-forum-makes-clear-climate-crisis

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